The things we buy at some point were given the task of alleviating the burdens of time, of boredom. Their importance has little to do with the things themselves, but with what owning them signifies. Objects are signifiers of success. As time re-distributes the value of owned objects, how might we define success without ownership?

I investigated designers and economists who questioned the future of capitalism, and either advocated for its change or acknowledged that change was inevitable. All agreed that "the network" provoked change in the way we economically value things and their ownership. The development of the network, not only as a technological innovation, but as a social framework helped reveal a natural human desire for connectivity, and thus the alternative of interaction as a commodity.

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This two-part project is composed of a research book display-image that organizes and frames findings in support of a second, experiential book, display-image which documents interactions under a proposed system.